Gratitude

Click here to listen to the audio recording of this 10-minute message. Or watch the YouTube video. Or read the text summary below.

Too often in my life, and perhaps in yours also, I ask God for something, but when that prayer is answered, I don’t thank God for it. In part, this is because I don’t notice the change, I don’t see the answer. And in part, it is because I don’t connect my prayer to God’s answer – I see the change as something natural and ordinary.

Luke provides us with a narrative about answered prayer and gratitude in Luke 17:11-19. Ten lepers call out to Jesus for pity or mercy. Jesus says to them, “Go, show yourselves to the priests”. That’s all Jesus says. He doesn’t do anything or saying else. But as the lepers obey Jesus, they are cleansed. Luke writes, “As they went, they were cleansed.”

This ‘as they went’ points to the quiet, unobtrusive actions of God. Miracles can happen as we are going about our everyday life. God’s work is often not dramatic and sensational – it is quiet, ordinary and easy to miss. Indeed, it seems only one of the ten lepers recognised that he had been cleansed: “he saw he was healed”.

This one comes back to Jesus, praising God (loudly), throws himself at Jesus’ feet and gives thanks to him. This one gives thanks! Jesus says to him, “Rise and go; your faith has made you well.” Indeed, his faith and Jesus healing ability had already made him well, while he was walking to the priests.

What, then, was the benefit of gratitude in this man? And what is the benefit of gratitude for us?

Because of his gratitude, this man gets an opportunity that none of the other nine got – to spend time with Jesus, and not at a distance as they were at the start of the story, but right at his feet. He gets to speak with Jesus. He gets some one-on-one time with Jesus.

When we are grateful for God’s work in our lives, we have two opportunities to engage with God: first at the beginning when we ask for God’s help, and then again later on when we give thanks. This double time with Jesus is the greatest gift of all – far greater than the answered prayer that we experienced.

Ten lepers by James C. Christensen, from http://www.greenwichworkshop.com/details/default.asp?p=1969&c=30&a=&t=1&page=2&detailtype=prints

Jesus’ heart

Click here to listen to the audio of this 15-minute message. Or watch the YouTube video below, or read the short summary thereafter.

Today we focus on the Jesus’ feeding of the 5,000 in Matthew 14:13-21. This is the ONLY miracle story to appear in ALL four Gospel accounts. It is clearly an important story for the Gospel writers. Perhaps something about it exemplifies Jesus and his ministry.

Usually, we focus on the miracle of the feeding, but today I invite you to focus on what we learn about Jesus’ heart. And Jesus’ heart reflects God’s heart. Here are five important things we learn about Jesus, that are relevant for each of us today:

  1. Jesus feels. The story opens with Jesus hearing of the execution of John – his cousin, friend and prophet. And he feels distressed about John’s death, he feels emotions, his heart is soft and responsive. So he withdraws, privately to a solitary place. Jesus grieves and feels. He is not unmoved.
  2. Jesus’ heart goes out. Even though Jesus tries to get away to be alone, crowds of people – thousands of people – follow him on foot. And instead of being irritated with them, he has compassion on them, his heart goes out to them. As he sees us and our difficulties, his heart softens, his heart fills with care.
  3. Jesus heals. As his heart fills with compassion, Jesus moves into action and heals people of their illness. The Greek word for ‘ill’ in v14 is used nowhere else in the New Testament. It is best translated ‘wretchedness’, meaning unhappy, broken-hearted, poor, downtrodden, ill. Jesus makes people whole, he restores them.
  4. Jesus embraces. The disciples want to send the crowds away, as they sent away children, lepers and others who wanted to speak to Jesus. But Jesus refuses. Instead, he instructs the disciples to feed the crowds, and invites the people to sit down on the grass. Jesus is crowd-centred, other-centred, generous, inclusive.
  5. Jesus multiplies. Jesus takes the tiny supplies of 5 loaves and 2 fish, and multiplies them to feed thousands. He is able to see through the smallness of what we offer, to the enormous good that God can do through them. He has eyes of faith that sees the potential of the tiny to do great work.

As continue to grapple through Covid, and the many challenges it presents to us, let us look into, let us gaze upon the heart of Christ – he who feels, whose heart goes out, who heals, who embraces and includes, and who multiplies. This same Christ is present for us today. Let us look for him and sit down with him and be fed by him.

2020.08.02_Jesus_heart2

Featured image: Sacred Heart of Jesus by Joseph Fanelli (Oil on Linen) 1993 from here

Called – Authorised – Sent

Click here to listen to the audio of this 18-minute message. Or watch the YouTube message below, or read the summary text thereafter.

Matthew 9:35-10:8 sets us on a path of discipleship in which we have the opportunity to participate in God’s work in building the Kingdom of Heaven or the Kingdom of God. Jesus’ message is “the good news of the kingdom”, which includes personal salvation as well as a transformation of the world in which we live. It shows God’s interest in the whole of human life, from the individual through to the societal.

But while the harvest is plentiful, the workers are few. Jesus calls the disciples to pray for workers who can participate with God in building the kingdom of Heaven. You are that worker! As am I! We pray regularly, “Thy Kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven”. And we are the answer to that prayer.

And then in Matthew 10:1 & 5, we read that Jesus:

  • Called his twelve disciples to him” – the calling is individual and collective. He calls you and he calls me, and he calls all of his followers, the church.
  • “Gave them authority” – Jesus authorises them to do God’s work in building the kingdom
  • Sent out” the disciples – he sends them out to do his work.

We are called, authorised and sent!

Jesus instructs them to proclaim this message: “The kingdom of heaven has come near”. The kingdom is near because Christ is near; and Christ is near, because he dwells in the hearts of his followers.

What does this look like in practice? Matthew lists four things that the disciples do. These are the same things Jesus has been doing. And Jesus does them not to show off his power, but to demonstrate the heart of God – God’s loving heart for humankind. These are:

  1. The ill are healed. This is about making people whole, and relieving pain and distress.
  2. The dead are raised. This points us forward to the resurrection of Christ, who becomes the first of the the many who will be raised to new life in Christ.
  3. Those with leprosy are cleansed. Leprosy was not just an illness, but also a social condition that lead to profound social exclusion and rejection. Cleansing or purification from the disease would lead to re-entry into the community, thus social restoration and integration.
  4. Demons are driven out. Demons oppress people, holding them in bondage. When they are driven out, people are liberated from oppression. This links to Jesus’ manifesto (Luke 4:18), where he proclaims freedom for prisoners and sets the oppressed free. In this way, oppressive power in human relationships is overcome.

The proclamation of the Kingdom being near, and the evidence of this in these four acts of service, show that God is interested in wholeness, life, social integration and liberation from oppression. These are all facets of salvation and all manifestations of God’s presence.

It is to this that we are called in this present time, a time when there is much fracturing of social relationships, much oppression, much brokenness.

We do this work out of a fullness of gratitude for what God has already done for us. “Freely you have received; freely give” (Matthew 10:8b).

2020.06.14_img_1467

Featured image from: https://thereeldeal.blog/2017/07/13/on-mission-for-jesus-mark-67-13/