Humility

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God calls us to humility – in our relationship with God, and in our relationship with other people.

Luke 18:9-14 gives us the parable of the pharisee and tax collector, both at prayer.

  1. The pharisee – a person who was devout, religious, righteous, obedient to God’s laws – stands and prays loudly about how wonderful he is and thanks God for not making him like those ‘other’ people (explicitly mentioning the tax collector). Jesus says that this person will not be justified before God, and that people like that, who exalt themselves, will be humbled.
  2. The tax collector – a person who was regarded as dishonest, extortionist and reprehensible, and who Jesus often refers to when talking about sinful people – hides away in a corner, cannot look up towards heaven and can pray only, “God, have mercy on me, a sinner”. Jesus says that this person will go home justified before God, and that a humble person like this will be exalted.

Clearly, God calls us to humility – both in our relationship with God and in our relationship with people.

Of course, this ‘humility’ is not about self-denigration or having a poor self-esteem or negative self-image. Paul says clearly in Romans 12:3 that humility is about assessing our strengths and weaknesses honestly and accurately: “Do not think of yourself more highly than you ought, but rather think of yourself with sober judgment.”

In our other reading for today – Hosea 5:13-6:6 – there is a dialogue between God and Israel:

  1. God observes that when Israel was in need, instead of turning to God, they turned for help to people who did not know God. Therefore, God sent suffering to them, to help them admit their guilt (i.e. to humble them) and until they sincerely sought God’s face.
  2. Israel then reflects that the suffering they have experienced is justified, and that despite God’s anger towards them, God will nevertheless heal them and bind up their wounds. They long to be revived and restored and to live in God’s presence. Twice they say, “Let us acknowledge God” – that word ‘acknowledge’ in Hebrew means ‘to know’ (as in knowing  a fact), but also as in knowing or discerning something not obvious (such as the truth of someone’s intentions), and is used as a euphemism for sex (as in, Adam knew Eve and she fell pregnant). Israel desires to be humble before God and to truly and intimately know God.
  3. God, the exasperated parent, responds positively. God reminds them that God’s desire is for mercy (hesed, meaning steadfast love and compassion) and acknowledgement (that ‘knowing’ word again), far more than empty religion (sacrifices and burned offerings).

Clearly, God calls us to humility – both in our relationship with God and in our relationship with people.

2019.03.30_Kneeling-in-Prayer_Rippelmeyer

Feature image ‘Kneeling in Prayer‘ by Nadine Rippelmeyer (2006)

2 thoughts on “Humility

  1. Trevor G Evans says:

    All of this is clear and good. In terms of preachers following that thin line between humility and influence, how do they ensure that self-balance is preserved?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Good question Trevor! Having been a priest for only a few months, I might not be the best person to answer. But for myself, I always preach from a position of frailty, never from a position of strength. I try to influence by holding up God’s word and by presenting myself as a fellow-traveller. I hear other preachers sometimes talking about their strong faith or vibrant prayer life. It makes me nervous, particularly because I can’t honestly claim those things, and partly because it sets oneself up as the example to follow, and that’s risky. I’d rather you follow Christ, not me. His example is great, mine is chequered. He doesn’t fall; I do, too often. People think when I say these things I’m just being overly self-effacing, but truly, I’m just being honest about myself. I know I have strengths; but I also know I have numerous weaknesses. These keep me on my knees and (I pray) humble. Blessings, Adrian

      Like

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