Eternity just here

Click here to listen to the audio recording of this 10-minute message. Or watch the YouTube video below, or read the text summary that follow.

Jesus goes up the mountain with Peter, James and John to pray (Luke 9:28-31). While he prays, the appearance of his face changes and his clothes become as bright as a lightning flash. And he is seen talking with Moses and Elijah, the great heroes of the Jewish community.

The boundary that separates the ordinary, daily, lived world that we inhabit from the world of the divine, of eternity, of spiritual beings, of God – that boundary is momentarily breached. It is like a dividing curtain has been pulled aside and we are given a glimpse into heaven itself.

These two worlds – the earthly finite world and the heavenly eternal world – are always touching, pressed right up against each other. Indeed, there are people crossing over from one to the other every minute, as they die.

The materialistic world view – that we believe in only what we can see and touch, measure and weigh – has become so prominent in the world today. Many people have given up any belief in a spiritual realm, in an afterlife, in God.

Luke tells us that Peter and his companions were very sleepy, but that when they became fully awake, they saw his glory (Luke 9:32). He emphasises this because we all know that when we sleep and dream, anything is possible. The rules of this material world do not apply when we are asleep. Had the disciples been ‘sleepy’ when they saw Jesus transfigure, we could put their story down to them just dreaming. But Luke emphasises this – they were fully awake – all of their critical, rational faculties, all of their empirical senses were fully active when they saw the glory of Jesus revealed.

How wonderful it would be if we were all fully awake so that we too could perceive the eternal that is just here.

2020.08.06_Saint_Catherines_TransfigurationFeatured image of the apse mosaic of the Transfiguration scene from St. Catherine monastery in Sinai, available here. This is the oldest known image of the transfiguration, dating to AD 565-6.

Visit this website to learn more about this piece of art, as well as other artists’ depictions of the transfiguration: http://tamedcynic.org/the-transfiguration-through-art/

5 thoughts on “Eternity just here

  1. edingight says:

    I love it. We don’t preach on this seminal moment nearly enough. So glad that you have.

    m

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks Michael. There are some theologians who regard this as Jesus’ greatest miracle. I’m not sure I agree with them – I think his incarnation and resurrection are his greatest miracles – but I do agree that this a unique and crucial moment of self-revelation that speaks to the immanence of God. Glad you enjoyed it. Much love, Adrian

    Like

  3. joanhill41gmailcom says:

    https://reflectionsofgodslove.com/2020/08/06/eternity-just-here/

    Hi , Lynn, I found this message so apt for these strange times that we are living in and so helpful. I hope you enjoy it too.

    We had some rain on Thursday and today is a perfect beach day, washed clean and sparkling.

    Lots of love J

    On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 at 8:18 am, Reflections of God’s Love wrote:

    > Adrian van Breda posted: “Click here to listen to the audio recording of > this 10-minute message. Or watch the YouTube video below, or read the text > summary that follow. Jesus goes up the mountain with Peter, James and John > to pray (Luke 9:28-31). While he prays, the appearance ” >

    Liked by 1 person

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